Is frequent dosing with ecstasy a risky business
for dopamine-containing neurons?

by
O'Shea E, Isabel Colado M.
Departamento de Farmacologia,
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid,
Avda Complutense s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain
Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2003 Jun;24(6):272-4


ABSTRACT

Over the past 20 years 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; also known as 'ecstasy') has become a widely used recreational drug of abuse. However, studies have indicated that it is neurotoxic to serotonergic nerve terminals in rats and non-human primates and dopaminergic nerve terminals in mice. Recently, this tenet has been questioned following a study suggesting that MDMA can cause toxicity to dopamine-containing neurons in monkeys. In this article, the factors contributing to this change in neurotoxic profile are discussed.
Vanoxerine
MDMA/MDE
Controversies
Protect and survive
MDMA and immunity
MDMA and dopamine
Dopaminergic damage
MDMA and serotonin synthesis
MDMA, serotonin and dopamine
Potentiation of dopamine release
Haloperidol pretreatment: effects


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