Dinosaur girls, candy girls, and Trinity: voices of Taiwanese club drug users
by
Leung KS, Li JH, Tsay WI, Callahan C, Liu SF, Hsu J, Hoffer L, Cottler LB.
Department of Psychiatry,
Washington University School of Medicine,
40N Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
leungks@epi.wustl.edu
J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2008;7(3):237-57.


ABSTRACT

Research among Asian users of methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA), also known as Ecstasy, is rare. To evaluate the feasibility of a study on the abuse of and dependence on Ecstasy, two focus groups of users (n= 12) and health professionals (n=7) were conducted in Taiwan. Major results included blatant human testing with "candy and dinosaur girls" and a specific sequence of drugs called a "Trinity" (Ecstasy, ketamine, and marijuana). "Head-shaked bars" and "KTVs" were public places where illegal behaviors were implicitly allowed. Depression after Ecstasy use was not reported. For future studies, participants suggested that magnetic resonance imaging could be a strong incentive for young users to enhance willingness to participate. Cultural issues of Ecstasy use are also discussed.

Taiwan
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Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

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