A clinical crossroads for MDMA
by
Guillot C.
University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA.
caseyguillot@hotmail.com
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2005 Dec;37(4):445-7.


ABSTRACT

Clinical studies of MDMA have been hindered by the fear of harming participants through MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. However, experimental animal studies and brain imaging studies of recreational Ecstasy users have not evidenced that a therapeutic dose of MDMA would be sufficient to cause long-term serotonergic deficits. Furthermore, the issue of potential neurotoxicity may not be as important as it first seems since certain chemicals have been shown to protect against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Although clinical studies conducted thus far have been promising, more research into the effects of MDMA administration in humans is needed before solid conclusions can be made in respect to the possibility of safely using MDMA as an adjunct to therapy. Finally, a clear distinction should be maintained between the recreational and clinical use of MDMA.

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